1970s Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint #1 (1970's)
1970s Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint #1 (1970's)
1970s Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint #1 (1970's)
1970s Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint #1 (1970's)
1970s Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint #1 (1970's)
1970s Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint #1 (1970's)
1970s Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint #1 (1970's)

1970s Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint #1 (1970's)

Normaler Preis
$60.00
Sonderpreis
$49.00

Marx Bigfoot / Sasquatch Handprint

Three plaster casts have been obtained of handprints of the reputed Bigfoot / Sasquatch. The prints measure more than half again greater than normal human hands and are relatively very broad. The thumb is non-opposable and there is correspondingly no elevation of the thenar eminence

During the summer of 1970, handprints of two of these animals were photographed and plaster casts of them were made by Ivan Marx, a game guide in northeastern Washington state. Marx loaned the original casts to Grover Krantz who then made molds from them in order to produce exact duplicates for further study.

Dr. Krantz passed away in 2002, but copies of this handprint are available here at BigFootCasts.com

An unexpected trait is the non-opposable thumb. The hand strongly suggests one designed for digging into the ground and for raking berries from bushes rather than being primarily for manipulating objects. Flexing all five digits in the same direction would best facilitate the suggested functions. Heavy callousing, including along all margins, would also be expected to follow from such uses.

Photo(s) may show multiple Bigfoot hand casts. Each are sold separately.

Handprint found by Ivan Marx, north of Colville, Washington, summer 1970. Length: 12.7 in. (32.3 cm.), Width: 10.4 in. (26.5 cm.). Plaster cast made by John W. Olsen in 1979 at Arizona State Museum from a cast obtained from Grover Krantz. (ASM Catalog No. 2011-470-2d)

 

 

 

BIG FOOTPRINTS

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"Figure 20. Two left hand prints. These casts were made in 1972 by Ivan Marx, who was then working on this research in northeastern Washington. They are clearly from different individuals, though both were impressed flat-handed into the ground in the same manner. The hands are disproportionately wide, the fingers are almost the same size as each other, and the thumbs are not opposed.

next chapter, also would appear to require a knowledge of primate anatomy that cannot easily be explained. In the late 1980s Paul Freeman brought in some casts of hand imprints from the Blue Mountains on the Washington-Oregon bor- der. The most impressive of these is a pair of almost flat prints that he told me were made on a stream bank when the sasquatch appar- ently stumbled onto one knee in midstream and slapped its hands down on the far bank as it fell. His description of the circumstances that he gave to Bob Titmus was rather different, which has raised some concern about their authenticity. The hands are complete except for a part of the "heel" of one where Freeman had built a cardboard dam to hold the plaster at the water's edge. Another specimen is the imprint of four knuckles and a thumb, evidently pressed into the ground as the sasquatch lost its footing and needed just a bit of additional support at that moment." - Grover Krantz

The pair of handprints from the stream bank are roughly similar to Marx's handprints from northeastern Washington in that they are very large and disproportionately wide (Fig. 21). They measure 8.5 and 9 inches across the widest parts of the palms, and the complete right hand is almost 13 inches long including the third digit: its wrist the impression and the exact edge of the palm